Friday, May 14, 2021

The last location of the missing K2 climbers was traced by satellite imagery

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Each template in our ever growing studio library can be added and moved around within any page effortlessly with one click. Combine them, rearrange them and customize them further as much as you desire. Welcome to the future of building with WordPress.

Each template in our ever growing studio library can be added and moved around within any page effortlessly with one click. Combine them, rearrange them and customize them further as much as you desire. Welcome to the future of building with WordPress.

The final locations of the three missing K2 climbers were tracked using satellite imagery.

Three international climbers, Mohamed Ali Sadpara from Pakistan, John Snorri from Iceland and JPMore from Chile, disappeared on February 6 after losing contact with base camp a week ago.

Their support team at K2 Base Camp stopped receiving messages from them on February 5 due to bad weather conditions at the world-famous peak, also known as Mount Savage.

The climbing team was officially declared missing the following day, as a search and rescue mission was launched for them.


Bad weather on the world’s second-highest mountain has repeatedly hampered rescue efforts, forcing authorities to use satellite imagery to locate missing climbers.

Local media announced on Friday that satellite imagery released and shared with Pakistan by Iceland and Chile showed the latest locations of the three missing climbers being tracked by satellite imagery.

After construction, the government began preparations for the launch of the largest satellite operation in K2 led by satellite imagery.

Previously, the Pakistani army had used its C-130 aircraft for the mission after bad weather interrupted the rescue mission. However, the aircraft was sent back from an altitude of 8,200 m due to a malfunction of the oxygen regulator. Earlier Thursday, Ali Sadpara’s son, Sajid Sadpara, informed the media that the climber may have had an accident while descending the “K2 “, the most dangerous route on the mountain. He said the lost hikers’ chances of survival were unmatched.

“There is no hope of living three consecutive days [in such harsh conditions]. When I came back from narrow thoughts at 8,200 meters, they climbed up a narrow throat at 11 a.m. [Friday].” I’m sure they made it to the top of K2 and might get into an accident on their way home. So you lost, “he added.

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