Children aged six years and over who need to be tested for the effectiveness of AstraZeneca vaccine

300 volunteers will take the test to see if a stroke triggers a strong immune response in children aged six to 17. The effectiveness of AstraZeneca vaccine in children should be tested in new clinical trials starting this month.

Researchers will deploy 300 volunteers to assess whether a stroke – known as the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. It produces a strong immune response in children between the ages of six and 17.

The Oxford Jab is one of three approved for adult use in the UK, along with those from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna.

The Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health said Covid-19 rarely causes death and serious illness in children.

“In children, it is clear that Covid-19 is associated with a much lower rate of morbidity and mortality than in adults,” he said.

“There is also evidence that children may be less likely to contract infection. The role of children in post-infection transmission is unclear. Although there is no clear evidence that they are more contagious than adults.”

The first vaccinations during the study will take place this month, with up to 240. And children receiving the vaccine and the rest receiving control meningitis.

Andrew Pollard, professor of pediatric infection and immunity and principal investigator at the Oxford Vaccine Study, said. “Although the vast majority of children are relatively unaffected by the coronavirus and are less likely to acquire infection. It is important to establish the safety and immune response of children and adolescents because some children can benefit from vaccination.

“This new experiment will expand our understanding of Sars-CoV2 control to younger age groups.”

Trials of AstraZeneca vaccine

Earlier this week, Britain’s (DCMOH) announced that several studies were underway to develop a safe and effective vaccine for adolescents.

“I believe that most of the major manufacturers are now focused on whether we can do some clinical trials to prove that our vaccine is safe and effective in children,” Prof Van-Tam told ITV News.

“And it is very likely that by the end of the year we will approve a children’s vaccine for Covid. It is possible, but not certain.

“This should not deter you, if your doctor agrees. That it is appropriate for your son or daughter to be vaccinated because of their vulnerability. However, it is an individual decision, always individual when drugs and vaccines are removed from the label.”

Evidence as to whether a vaccine reduces transmission is unclear. Although there is positive evidence from Israel with Pfizer Jab and similar initial results for Oxford / AstraZeneca.

The University of Oxford says it is the first test in the 6-17 age group. It said other studies has started but only measured effectiveness of AstraZeneca vaccine in 16 and 17 year olds.

Rin Song, pediatrician and clinician at the Oxford Vaccine Group, said: “Apart from rare serious illnesses and illnesses, the Covid-19 pandemic also has profound negative effects on the education, social development and emotional well-being of children and adolescents.

“It is therefore important to collect data on the safety and immune response of our coronavirus vaccines in this age group so that they could potentially benefit from being included in the vaccination program in the near future.”

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